NBA Playoffs 2012 predictions

NBA Playoffs 2012 predictions

FOXBORO, MA - JANUARY 14:  Tim Tebow #15 of the Denver Broncos looks on against the New England Patriots during their AFC Divisional Playoff Game at Gillette Stadium on January 14, 2012 in Foxboro, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

Jim Rogash/Getty Images

Nike will release their new NFL uniforms on Tuesday, effectively leaving one of their biggest competitors, Reebok, in the dust.

Reebok has been the league’s only apparel licensee for the last decade. Now is the perfect time for a change.

We’ll break down why Nike is superior to Reebok, as well as why Nike management made a great decision to outbid their biggest rival.

1. Phil Knight

Phil Knight, the co-founder of Nike, is one of the most creative minds in the sports-apparel business.

An alumnus of the University of Oregon, he’s responsible for bringing uniforms like these to Eugene.

The Ducks have an inordinate amount of jersey combinations at their disposal thanks to Knight, which means NFL teams will as well.

The new uniforms will look best in unusual colors like Oregon’s yellow, green and black. Look for the Seattle Seahawks, Jacksonville Jaguars and Denver Broncos to have some exciting jerseys this season thanks to their interesting color schemes.

2. Reebok has produced boring products

From the color schemes to the actual designs, Reebok has been subpar when it comes to impressing with their uniforms.

The New York Giants’ jerseys are boring, the Chicago Bears’ too. The Cleveland Browns’ jerseys are just, well, brown.

Somebody should tell Nike to never produce anything like these New York Jets jerseys.

3. The gloves

It may seem strange to make the case that the gloves put Nike ahead of Reebok, but that is indeed the case.

Just look at these gloves. And these gloves. And these.

Most of the time, those designs won’t be visible to the fans, but they’re still exciting to look at on the Internet gallery.

4. “Just Do It”

The Nike apparel contract stretches beyond the jerseys and into everyday life. ESPN got a peek at some of the shirts and hats the Nike will be producing for the NFL.

The allure of “Just Do It” is cherished by consumers nationwide. Sales are going to skyrocket once people start seeing the slogan under their team name.

Although Nike put up some insane amount of money to steal the rights away from Reebok, it will be worth it for them (and all of the fans) in the future.

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“NFL Leaves Reebok in the Dust”

FOXBORO, MA - JANUARY 14:  Tim Tebow #15 of the Denver Broncos looks on against the New England Patriots during their AFC Divisional Playoff Game at Gillette Stadium on January 14, 2012 in Foxboro, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

 

Jim Rogash/Getty Images

Nike will release their new NFL uniforms on Tuesday, effectively leaving one of their biggest competitors, Reebok, in the dust.

Reebok has been the league’s only apparel licensee for the last decade. Now is the perfect time for a change.

We’ll break down why Nike is superior to Reebok, as well as why Nike management made a great decision to outbid their biggest rival.

 

1. Phil Knight

Phil Knight, the co-founder of Nike, is one of the most creative minds in the sports-apparel business.

An alumnus of the University of Oregon, he’s responsible for bringing uniforms like these to Eugene.

The Ducks have an inordinate amount of jersey combinations at their disposal thanks to Knight, which means NFL teams will as well.

The new uniforms will look best in unusual colors like Oregon’s yellow, green and black. Look for the Seattle Seahawks, Jacksonville Jaguars and Denver Broncos to have some exciting jerseys this season thanks to their interesting color schemes.

 

2. Reebok has produced boring products

From the color schemes to the actual designs, Reebok has been subpar when it comes to impressing with their uniforms. 

 

The New York Giants’ jerseys are boring, the Chicago Bears’ too. The Cleveland Browns’ jerseys are just, well, brown.

Somebody should tell Nike to never produce anything like these New York Jets jerseys.

 

3. The gloves

It may seem strange to make the case that the gloves put Nike ahead of Reebok, but that is indeed the case.

Just look at these gloves. And these gloves. And these.

Most of the time, those designs won’t be visible to the fans, but they’re still exciting to look at on the Internet gallery.

 

4. “Just Do It”

The Nike apparel contract stretches beyond the jerseys and into everyday life. ESPN got a peek at some of the shirts and hats the Nike will be producing for the NFL.

The allure of “Just Do It” is cherished by consumers nationwide. Sales are going to skyrocket once people start seeing the slogan under their team name.

Although Nike put up some insane amount of money to steal the rights away from Reebok, it will be worth it for them (and all of the fans) in the future.

Kohl’s Using Olympic Athletes For First Time In Female-Targeted Marketing Campaign

Kohl’s department stores yesterday announced its spring integrated marketing campaign, featuring U.S. Gold Medalists Dara Torres (swimming), Mia Hamm (soccer) and Lindsey Vonn (skiing). The new campaign, titled “Shop to Win,” debuted yesterday and follows each of the three female athletes during recent Kohl’s shopping trips. It is the first time Kohl’s has used Olympic athletes in its marketing efforts (Kohl’s). USA TODAY’s Roxanna Scott noted the campaign is targeted at “suburban moms shopping for themselves and their families.” All three women are “top names in the sports marketing and sponsorship world.” But Forbes noted that “none cracked the top 10 for leading female highest-paid athletes” in ’11 (USATODAY.com, 3/19).

mariaficca1marketing

New York Times Article on Marketing Strategies

I found this article pretty interesting because I personally love cars and tend to pay attention to car commercials. The answer to the first question, “The commercial, called “Revolution,” promotes the Mazda Skyactiv powertrain technology and is composed of numerous brief clips and vignettes that unfold in rapid-fire fashion.” explains how Mazda gets their point across and draws the audience in to want to buying the car.

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